Awww. Baby red panda

It was love at first sight for Shama and Tate, the red pandas at the Smithsonian’s National Zoo, and now, nearly 1½ years after they were introduced, the pair has a cub as evidence of their strong bond. On Wednesday, June 16, Shama gave birth to a single cub—the first for both of the Zoo’s red pandas (Ailurus fulgens) and the first red panda cub born at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., in 15 years.

Red pandas have a baby. It’s very cute.

The National Zoo is celebrating its first birth of a red panda in 15 years. The history of the red panda–at least, of its classification–is complicated. More on that in a mo. What’s significant here is its current situation. Thanks to habitat loss, the species has declined in the wild to fewer than 2500 individuals, and it is endangered. So a birth–especially between an apparently happy couple with a strong mutual attraction–is a success for the zoo and for red panda conservation, too.

The proud mother was born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., and more than 100 surviving cubs have been born at both this research facility and the Washington, D.C., campuses since 1962.

Panda or raccoon?

Taxonomists–the folks who classify organisms by relatedness–have had a conundrum on their hands with the red panda. You’d think that the name says it all: it’s a panda, right?

Well, no. Nothing’s ever that easy in taxonomy. For some time, arguments that it was a relative of the raccoon held weight. But the animal has some strong panda-like traits, including an affinity for bamboo and similar habitats to the giant panda. But they differ in their far more diverse diet and greater habitat distribution.

The panda’s thumb

The giant panda has a faux thumb that’s really just a bone extension of the wrist bones. It’s not an opposable thumb like the one primates have, but the giant panda uses it in a thumb-like way. The red panda happens to share this odd trait. They also share many similarities in their DNA, which ended in the red panda briefly joining the bear family.

So, is it a panda or a raccoon?

The species also has some commonalities with the raccoon, including the ringed tail and more diverse diet compared to the giant panda, one that includes a taste for bird eggs. For these reasons, it also has been classified into the raccoon family. So, which family is it?

It’s neither. While the red panda has now been classified as a distant relative of the giant panda–the bamboo! the “thumb”!–it falls into its very own family, the Ailuridae, of which the red panda, or Ailurus fulgens, is the sole member. Unlike bears, this species arose in Asia and never made the trek to the “new world.”

Interesting note, the snow leopard–another severely endangered species–is their sole wild predator.

Polio vaccine-related polio

Polio virus bits in vaccine rarely join forces with other viruses, become infectious

[Note: some of the links in this piece are to New England Journal of Medicine papers. NEJM does not make its content freely available, so unfortunately, unless you have academic or other access, you’d have to pay per view to read the information. I fervently support a world in which scientific data and information are freely available, but…money is money.]

Worldwide, billions of polio vaccine doses have been administered, stopping a disease scourge that before the vaccine killed people–mostly children–by the thousands in a horrible, suffocating death (see “A brief history of polio and its effects,” below). The polio vaccination campaign has been enormously successful, coming close to the edge of eradicating wild-type polio.

But, as with any huge success, there have been clear negatives. In a few countries–15, to be exact–there have been 14 outbreaks of polio that researchers have traced to the vaccines themselves.  The total number of such cases as of 2009 was 383. The viral pieces in the vaccine–designed to attract an immune response without causing disease–occasionally recombine with other viruses to form an active version of the pathogen. Some kinds of viruses–flu viruses come to mind–can be notoriously tricky and agile that way.

Existing vaccine can prevent vaccine-related polio

Odd as it sounds, the existing vaccines can help prevent the spread of this vaccine-related form of polio. The recombined vaccine-related version tends to break out in populations that are underimmunized against the wild virus, as happened in Nigeria. Nigeria suspended its polio vaccination program in 2003 because rumors began to circulate that the vaccine was an anti-Muslim tactic intended to cause infertility. In 2009, the country experienced an outbreak of vaccine-derived virus, with at least 278 children affected. Experts have found that the existing vaccine can act against either the wild virus or the vaccine-derived form, both of which have equally severe effects. In other words, vaccinated children won’t get either.

Goal is eradication of virus and need for vaccine

Having come so close to total eradication before wild-type-associated cases plateaued between 1000 and 2000 annually in the 21st century, global health officials hold out the hope for two primary goals. They hope to eradicate wild-type polio transmission through a complete vaccination program, which, in turn, will keep vaccine-derived forms from spreading. Once that goal is achieved, they will have reached the final target: no more need for a polio vaccine.

As Dr. Bruce Aylward, Director of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative at WHO, noted: “These new findings suggest that if (vaccine-derived polio viruses) are allowed to circulate for a long enough time, eventually they can regain a similar capacity to spread and paralyse as wild polioviruses. This means that they should be subject to the same outbreak response measures as wild polioviruses. These results also underscore the need to eventually stop all (oral polio vaccine) use in routine immunization programmes after wild polioviruses have been eradicated, to ensure that all children are protected from all possible risks of polio in future.”

If that sounds nutty, it’s been done. Until the early 1970s, the smallpox vaccination was considered a routine vaccination. But smallpox was eradicated, and most people born after the early ’70s have never had to have the vaccine.

A brief history of polio and its effects

I bring you the following history of polio, paraphrased from information I received from a physician friend of mine who works in critical care:

The original polio virus outbreaks occurred before the modern intensive care unit had been invented and before mechanical ventilators were widely available. In 1947-1948, the polio epidemic raged through Europe and the United States, with many thousands of patients dying a horrible death due to respiratory paralysis. Slow asphyxiation is one of the worst ways to die, which is precisely why they simulate suffocation in torture methods such as water boarding. The sensation is unendurable.

In the early twentieth-century polio epidemics, they put breathing tubes down the throats of patients who were asphyxiating due to the respiratory paralysis caused by the polio virus. Because ventilators were unavailable, armies of medical students provided the mechanical respiratory assist to the patients by hand-squeezing a bag which was connected to the breathing tube, over and over and over, 16 times a minute, 24 hours each day, which drove air in and out of the patients’ lungs.  Eventually the iron lung was developed and became widely implemented to manage polio outbreaks. The iron lung subsequently gave way to the modern ventilator, which is another story.

Wordless Wednesday: Dolphin diplomacy

(almost wordless…)

Move over, cockroaches. Dolphins have the communication game down to diplomacy:

(Credit: iStockphoto/Stephan Zabel)

Cockroaches are collective food critics

Collective communication guides cockroach dining decisions

Ever drive by a restaurant with an empty parking lot and avoid it yourself because, well, no one else was eating there? If so, you’re not much different from cockroaches. They also appear more attracted to food resources if other cockroaches dine there, as well.

Yes, cockroaches creep me out, too

They’re the only animal about which I’m phobic, but who could resist a story like this? A new study published in Behavioral Ecology and Social Biology has found that cockroaches communicate with each other about preferable food sources, much as people do.  Rather than doing it through visuals of empty parking lots or restaurants or via a critic’s recommendations, however, they probably use pheromones. So, there may be a cockroach pheromone or suite of the chemicals that says, “Hey, this pile of garbage is the best in town!”

The researchers who determined this used a couple of piles of food. The roaches collectively would spend more time and in greater numbers at one pile of food over another. Even more interesting–at least to cockroach researchers–the bugs would linger longer at the dining source if other roaches were there, too. Peer pressure, it appears, is not only a human phenomenon.

It’s not limited only to cockroaches in the insect world, either. There are many other examples of insect chemical communication guiding collective behavior. The most famous is probably the honeybee waggle dance, which the animals use to indicate which way to go to find the best food resources.

Why should we care?

Why would researchers go to the trouble of monitoring cockroach choices over piles of food? One reason is that if we identified the pheromone that communicates “good food pile” to cockroaches, we could use that to lure them into our little pest-control traps. Ever diabolical that way, we humans are. There are some things not even cockroaches can do.

The Complete Idiot’s Guide to College Biology now available

Available in book stores and online from such fine vendors as Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble. Get your copy today, and I hope that you find it helpful and informative.

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